How to Reinstall/Clean Install Windows 10

There are a few reasons you may want to reinstall Windows 10. You might be looking to sell your computer or you may just have a load of files on your computer that’s making a mess, and you just want to tidy it all up. Luckily, with Windows 10, Microsoft has made it nice and easy to reinstall Windows back to its original state. I’ll be covering the main two ways to do so. The most simple and easy to do method of reinstalling Windows was introduced in Windows 8 and carried through to Windows 10. What you need to do is go to the Settings app, then go to “Update & Security” and then on the sidebar to go to “Recovery” and then click the “Get Started” button under “Reset this PC”.

Now what you get to do is choose a few options, if you want to keep all your files where they are you can choose the option there, or if you want to get rid of everything you can click the “Remove everything” button. Obviously, if you have any important documents that you want to keep, make sure that they are backed up onto a USB drive or Cloud Storage just to make sure that they’re safe. Here you get some options such as secure wiping or quick wiping. You’ll want to use the second option if you’re going to get rid of the computer because it is more difficult for people to use recovery tools to recover your data. Once you’ve done that the computer will restart and it’ll take around an hour to fully sort everything out. Once it’s done you’ll be able through the Windows setup. Then, once you’ve signed in and created your account and everything you’ll be back on the desktop.

So that’s the easiest way to do it, as you can see the start menu and everything has been reset. But there is another way to do it, which is actually my preferred method. This means that you’ll need a USB drive that’s at least 8GB and you’ll want to download the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool. This method is going to be using a USB drive to install Windows from, so actually, we can make sure that nothing from the previous Windows installation gets carried through. So you’ll want to download the Media Creation Tool and now when you’re going through these menu options, click “Create installation media” and then you’ll also want to make sure that you’ve plugged a USB drive into the computer. Here, you’ll want to pick your settings such as language and architecture. If you’re not sure which architecture you actually have you can go to Windows Explorer, go on “This PC”, right click and go to “Properties” and then you can see under the system information the system type. So as you can see mine is a 64-bit operating system, so that’s the option I’m going to pick there and everything else looks alright.

I’m going to choose the option to just write this straight to the USB drive and you’ll obviously want to make sure that nothing is on that drive because this process is going to wipe the USB drive. I’m going to select my USB drive there and I’m going to double check that there’s nothing on it and then I can click next and then it’s going to download Windows 10 and put it onto the USB stick. One thing I do like to do is to just write down the product key somewhere so I use this VisualBasic script, and I just gave this to my desktop and I run it. What this will do is bring up a text box with the product key and I like to do this just in case Windows doesn’t remember the product key. But it should do it because Windows 10 usually automatically activates Windows with the hardware now and it will recognise your computer automatically.

But I like to do this just to be sure. So, when you run the script the product key appears on the screen and you can take a picture of this or write it down somewhere, just in case you need it. So now it’s actually time to install Windows. Plug the USB drive into the computer that you’re going to be reinstalling Windows on, I’d also recommend unplugging any unnecessary USB drives or extra hard drives at this point. Turn it on, and press the boot menu key. If you’re not sure what the boot menu key is a quick Google will help you out but usually it tends to be F12 or something like that. So then you can pick the USB drive as the boot device, this will start the Windows installation wizard. As you can see now, I’m at the Windows setup and I’m just going to click next and Install Now. As you can see the setup is starting.

Now here, it’s going to ask you for your product key, but Windows should automatically activate anyway, so you can just click “I don’t have a product key” as you’re simply just reinstalling Windows. If it asks you for what version of Windows you’re running you can use the System Info screen that you looked at previously for the architecture to double check your Windows version.

Now you just need to accept the license agreement, and then you want to select “Custom” so we can manage partitions. Now you can see there are many different partitions here and you’ll want to make note of the drive numbers and the labels in case you have a secondary drive – you don’t want to delete the partition for that because otherwise, you’ll just lose your data. Drive 0 is my operating system drive on the screen, so I’m going to delete all the partitions that were there so I have a fresh set of Windows partitions made by the installer. Double check your partitions and your drive’s because it’s not my fault if you accidentally wipe everything. Now as you can see, Windows is starting the install process, this usually doesn’t take that long for installing from a USB drive – it should take around 20 minutes. Usually, it tends to be faster than that, it really depends on how fast your computer is. So as you can see it’s now restarting and you can just continue through the Windows setup like before in the video.

So as you can see now, this is the desktop and and as you can see it’s quite small so you might need to double check driver settings and anything like that but if you want to double check your Windows activation you can go to the Settings app and it will say on the bottom of the screen there if you need to type in your product key.

By admin / Tips and Advice / / 0 Comments

Installing a SSD or solid state drive in your new Dell notebook or ultrabook PC has many advantages over the older hard disk drives, like faster boot times and longer battery life.

And they are easy to install too, here's how.

But before you begin there are a couple things you need to know.

First, if you're installing an SSD in a new computer, setup will be a breeze, just make sure you have the install discs that came with your computer.

Otherwise, you will need to backup or clone your existing drive.

And before upgrading anything in your computer, it's always a good idea to make sure your system BIOS is up-to-date.

Check Dell's website before you begin.

Next, your work surface should be clean and you should ground yourself first by touching an unpainted metal surface to prevent damage to any components.

And lastly, in many cases, a simple Phillips head screw driver is all you'll need to replace the hard drive in your notebook computer.

With your computer shutdown, remove the power adapter and the battery.

And just to be sure all the remaining power is drained from the computer press the power button after the battery is removed.

Next, find where the hard drive is located.

Usually on the underside of your computer.

If you have trouble finding it, check Dell's website first.

Now, unscrew and remove the cover and you should have a good view of the old hard drive in your computer.

Each model will be slightly different, but carefully remove the screws, to disconnect the SATA and power connector, usually by sliding the drive away from the connection to remove the drive from the computer.

And if you have a supporting bracket, like we do, remove it and set it aside.

When installing the new SSD drive, re-attach any brackets that were used on the old drive to the new SSD drive first.

And it's important the SATA and power connection is securely connected when you slide the SSD into the drive bay.

It'll fit snugly, but don't force it in.

Screw it into place.

Replace the cover and the battery, now flip the computer back over and turn the computer on.

You may be alerted that there's no operating system, just insert the original install discs that came with your computer and restart again and boot from the CD-ROM.

Just follow the prompts to install the operating system and restore from a backup.

And that's it.

If you have any other questions or need additional help installing a SSD in your computer, be sure to visit www.

Kingston.

Com/support for more information.

Thanks for watching.

By admin / Tips and Advice / / 0 Comments

Installing an SSD, or a solid state disk drive in your DELL desktop computer has many benefits over the older hard disk drives, like faster boot times, plus, it's really easy to do.

Here's how.

But before you begin there are a couple things you need to know.

First, if you have the install discs that came with your computer, the setup will be a breeze, otherwise, you will need to backup or clone your old hard drive.

And it's always a good idea to make sure your system BIOS is up-to-date first, so check Dell's website before you begin.

Next, your work surface should be clean and you should ground yourself first by touching an unpainted metal surface to prevent damage to any components.

Start by shutting down your computer and removing all cables from the back.

And it's important to remember where each cable belongs when plugging them back in after you're finished.

If you plan on adding the SSD drive, instead of replacing your old hard drive, you need an available drive bay, which should be easily accessible inside the computer, by removing one of the side panels.

In most cases, you wont need any tools whatsoever to remove the side panel, because several computer manufacturers have switched to easy-to-remove thumbscrews or latches.

Otherwise, consult Dell's website before you begin.

Once you get it open you'll have a clear view of the drive bays, find old hard drive and you'll most likely find another bay nearby.

If you don't have a 2.

5" drive bay available, you'll have to attach a bracket, like this, to the SSD to fit the larger 3.

5" drive bay.

Slide the drive in to place with the SATA and power connector facing outwards where you can access them, and line up the holes to screw it securely into place.

Now, locate an unused power cable inside the computer.

Any one will do, just follow the group of cable coming from the power supply until you find one.

Or, use the existing power cable from your old hard drive and connect it to the SSD.

Next, connect the SATA cable from the motherboard to the SSD.

You can follow the SATA cable from your old hard drive to the motherboard to find and available SATA connectrion or use the existing cable that was connect to your old hard drive if your replacing your old hard drive.

Now, connect the other end to the SSD.

Slide the side panel back on, screw it into place, plug the cables back in, and with that done, now turn on your computer and insert the operating system installation CDs.

And when prompted, boot from the CD-ROM drive.

You can now install the operating system to the new SSD, just be sure that if you left your old hard drive in, that you don't re-install over your old hard drive, or you could lose all your data.

And you might also have to change the boot order from the old hard drive to the new SSD before copying over your files or after you restore from a backup.

And that's it! If you have any other questions or need additional help installing an SSD drive in your computer, be sure to visit www.

Kingston.

Com/support for more information.

Thanks for watching.